#1  
  12-24-2009, 11:07 AM
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which fantasia version should i get?

the one that comes with the anthology?


or the 60th anniversary one?


or are they the same?

i'm only interested in the "fantasia" dvd.
i already have the "fantasia 2000" & "fantasia legacy" dvds.
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  #2  
  12-24-2009, 04:44 PM
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for a min i thought u were talking about american idol winner from years back lol.
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  #3  
  12-25-2009, 04:17 AM
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See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fantasi...elease_history

According to that, the 60th Anniversary version has some new audio dubs added in to replace some lost to time, and a scene is still edited. It is, however, the seeming lesser of evils of available versions.

Quote:
1940

Fantasia was originally released in 1940 by Walt Disney Productions itself as a roadshow release, since Disney's distributor RKO Radio Pictures backed out of the film. Its first playdate, the film's premiere, was in New York City on November 13, 1940. The final scene to be shot (the long multiplane pan in the Ave Maria sequence) was completed, developed, printed, and rushed via airplane to New York that same day, where it was spliced into the film a mere four hours before showtime. Primarily because of the amount of audio equipment required and the time necessary to make the installation, the full-length Fantasound version of Fantasia was only shown at 12 theatres, and only 16 Fantasound-equipped prints were ever made. Fantasia's extremely large budget, however, meant that the film was unable to turn a profit during its initial release.[12]

1941

Starting with the January 29, 1941 play date in Los Angeles, California, RKO assumed distribution of Fantasia. They had the film's soundtrack remixed into monophonic sound, to make it easier to distribute, and added their logos to the film's solitary title card.

In late 1941, RKO had the 125-minute Fantasia edited down to 81 minutes (done by deleting the entire Toccata and Fugue in D Minor segment and shortening the live-action Deems Taylor sequences as much as possible). This version of the film was released nationwide on January 6, 1942 — the first time Fantasia was given a wide release — with the tagline "Fantasia Will Amaze Ya!" With a world war now looming, the edited film didn't capture large enough audiences to become profitable and it quickly disappeared from the screen. The financial failure of Fantasia left the Disney studio in difficult financial straits, and made it necessary to quickly produce a relatively low-budget feature, Dumbo, as their next project.[4]

According to Time magazine, the film was popular with audiences that saw it, and also boosted the classical music industry.[13] However, most sources cite the film as Disney's first great box-office failure, and commentators such as Leonard Maltin blame its initial failure on the public's unwillingness to accept Disney as a popularizer of classical music.

1946

Fantasia was revised once again in 1946, restoring Toccata and Fugue, but still keeping the Deems Taylor sequences to a minimum. This is the version most familiar to the public and the version most future releases of Fantasia would be based upon, and is therefore called the "General Release Version". It retains all of the animation from the original, but omits portions of the live action.

1956

Stereo sound was restored to Fantasia in 1956, when it was released in CinemaScope-compatible SuperScope. Only one operating Fantasound setup, and one Fantasound-equipped print, had survived by this time; the sound negatives were stored on nitrate film and had already deteriorated.[14] The output from the four-track Fantasound system was transferred via high-quality telephone lines to an RCA facility and recorded onto magnetic tape. The magnetic recording was mixed to create a new final four-channel stereo mix for the widescreen release.[14] The film was projected in various aspect ratios by actually changing the anamorphic properties of the lens on the fly by using the fourth sound track as a control track, much like the original control track was used to redirect the sound in the 1940 release.[15]

1969

Fantasia did not make a profit until its 1969 rerelease. By then, Fantasia had become immensely popular among teenagers and college students, some of whom would reportedly take drugs such as marijuana and LSD to "better experience" the film.[4] Disney promoted the film using a psychedelic-styled poster. The rerelease was a major success, especially with the psychedelic young adult crowd, many of whom would come lie down in the front row of the theater and experience the film from there.

The film was once again edited for the 1969 release, this time to remove the character Sunflower, a centaur depicted as an African-American girl in the Pastoral Symphony segment. According to the Memory Hole, "Performing menial duties for the blonde, white female centaurs, Sunflower is a racial stereotype along the lines of Amos and Andy, Buckwheat, and Aunt Jemima."[16]

1982

For its 1982 reissue, as motion picture sound technology was advancing, the 1956 Fantasia sound master was deemed both unusable and unsalvageable. The Disney Studios decided to completely rerecord the film's soundtrack, and a new digitally recorded score arranged and conducted by Irwin Kostal was made. This marked the first time a motion picture's score was recorded entirely using digital technology. Additional edits included replacing Deems Taylor's original narration with new introductions spoken by voice artist Hugh Douglas and removing most of the live action. This version of Fantasia would be rereleased again in 1985.

1990

For Fantasia's 50th anniversary in 1990, Disney decided to go back to the original Stokowski recording. Using the 1956 stereo soundtrack and the 1941 mono soundtrack as his source material, Disney audio engineer Terry Porter restored the Stokowski soundtrack using digital technology to an approximation of the original multi-channel Fantasound mix.[14] In the meantime, Peter Comandini at YCM Laboratories worked on restoring the picture from original camera negatives, edited and duplicate negatives, and, in the cases of some scenes, archival prints.[14] The film was re-edited to closely resemble the 1946 General Release Version, save for the retention of the 1969 censorship edit and the addition of an end credits sequence (played over footage from the original roadshow version's intermission). This restored version of Fantasia was also released on VHS and laser disc home video in 1991.[4]

2000

Most recently, for its 60th Anniversary DVD release in the year 2000, Disney's manager of film restoration, Scott MacQueen, supervised a restoration and reconstruction of the original 125-minute roadshow version of Fantasia. The visual elements from the Deems Taylor segments that had been cut from the film in 1942 and 1946 were restored, as was the intermission. However, the original nitrate audio negatives for the long-unseen Taylor scenes had deteriorated several decades earlier, so Disney brought in voice actor Corey Burton to rerecord all of Taylor's lines.

Although it was advertised as the "original uncut" version, the Sunflower edit in Beethoven's Symphony No. 6 was maintained. In this version it was accomplished by digitally zooming in on certain frames to avoid showing the black centaurette character. The Disney editor responsible, John Carnochan, was quoted as saying, "It's sort of appalling to me that these stereotypes were ever put in."[17]

With the exception of these changes, this is the most complete version of the film that currently exists. The restored roadshow version of Fantasia debuted in June 2000 at the Animation Film Festival in Annecy, France; accompanying its sequel, Fantasia 2000.

This restored roadshow version of Fantasia was first released on DVD in 2000, and is the only version of the film to appear in that format. Its sequel Fantasia 2000 soon followed, but both were removed from circulation in late 2004. Disney announced in 2009 that the film will be released on March 2nd 2010 as a "Diamond Edition" in both Blu-Ray and DVD formats along with Fantasia 2000.[18][19]
I'm appalled that people feel the need to censor things. Oh no, we might hurt somebody's feelings. Poor baby. God forbid we enjoy the art as it was created, not as you feel it should be.
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  #4  
  12-25-2009, 04:18 AM
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On an added note, I have never seen Fantasia front to back, in one sitting. I always fall asleep.
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  #5  
  12-25-2009, 09:46 AM
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ls, ta for that.
i'll wait for march 2010 and see if the diamond edition is the one to go for or not.
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  #6  
  12-25-2009, 09:52 AM
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and yeah i sorta agree with you about watching the whole of fantasia in one sitting. quite hard to do.

had the same issue with 2001 a space oddysey.
used to fall asleep all the time.
one time, i recorded it and tried to watch it in 15 minutes segments.
even that was too much for me!
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